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Gynecomastia

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Posts: 594
 Leah
Baroness
Topic starter
(@leah63)
Honorable Member     Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America
Joined: 6 years ago

Recently I found I had a lump forming behind my left nipple. I went in for a mammogram and they diagnostic it to be gynecomastia, non cancerous.   Which is all great.

They list possible conditions of excess Estrogen levels liver issues, aging, ( this is common in 25% of males over age 60), Klinefelter syndrome (XXY) and some medications.  So my question is that does this come into play at all with my cross dressing or desire to cross dress?

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42 Replies
8 Replies
Guest
(@Anonymous 93000)
Joined: 4 months ago

Estimable Member
Posts: 121

@leah63 I am glad it was not cancer.  Your question is over my pay grade.  I am not sure if our feminine desires alone can produce higher estrogen levels.

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Guest
(@Anonymous 93000)
Joined: 4 months ago

Estimable Member
Posts: 121

@leah63  unless you’re xxy or have elevated E, which can be tested, I doubt there’s much association (besides happy coincedence)between gynecomastia and cross dressing.   I presume your blood tests will indicate if your E is elevated.

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(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@leah63 I don't know if it really relates, but I'm 75, and for the most part have had fairly normal male breasts all my life,  Never grew hair on my chest, or anywhere on my body fortunately, but my breasts were never anything abnormal or that anyone noticed before.  But since my wife passed and I began to allow my feminine side to come out, my breasts became fuller.  I don't know if they'll allow me to post it here, but also, eventually when I found a male friend, and we became intimate, my breasts really started to develop.  Today I'm around a B cup with no HRT or any hormones.  They've reached a size where I could no longer hide them any more, I have to wear a bra, and had to come out to my friends.  And they continue to grow.  I'm no doctor, or any type of professional in any of this, learning as I go along like the rest of us here, but I do believe that as you give up living a male role and become more feminine, and participating in feminine ways, spending more and more time not only crossdressing but thinking and OMG, feeling feminine, our own personal hormone balance begins to change, and our body responds accordingly.  I love it, I never thought my body, at this age, would ever change any more except for the worse, but it is.  And emotions, as males we're not trained to deal with the feelings, the emotions, that also come as your hormone balance changes.   So, to sum it up, in my opinion, based on my personal experience, I believe that yes, it does relate to your feminine desires.  Our body's are controlled by our brains, we program our brains, I forget what positive thinking writer wrote it, but he said "What we can conceive and believe we can achieve".   Oh, I've lost weight too, my waist has slimmed over 3 inches so far, my hips and butt have increased in size.  Believe in yourself.

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Lady
(@florapgh)
Joined: 1 year ago

Trusted Member     Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania, United States of America
Posts: 48

@jenniferr I have to agree with you on all of your theories.  I purposely wanted to increase my breast size.  So, I started with progesterone cream, fenugreek for increased estrogen and saw palmetto to block testosterone.  Along with daily breast massage, I now can respectfully fill a C cup.  While the jury is still out on the effects of the supplements, I believe my brain has also altered my body chemistry.  I’ve always been an effeminate man, but I’ve always tried to hide that part of me.  My natural feminine characteristics were not learned behavior being raised in a household full of testosterone, but any masculinity that I used to exhibit was, in fact, learned behavior.  Now that I’ve accepted the femininity that Mother Nature gave me, I have noticed physical changes.  I’ve always been more emotional that my male peers so, the emotional side of me really hasn’t changed too much.  But the physical and mental aspects have certainly become more feminine.  I think some of us women are predisposed to be who and what we are.  I’m no scientist, but since I’ve accepted my true nature there has been a transition.  I often wonder how I would react to hrt.  Aside from the wonderful physical changes, would I feel any different otherwise?

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Duchess
(@aliceblack)
Joined: 4 years ago

Reputable Member     Massachusetts, United States of America
Posts: 344

@jenniferr Enjoyed reading your response. I wear a 42b and with popup bras I am able to accentuate my breasts. I also getting into wearing shapewear(girdles, corsets, bustiers) and I think I am being to develop an hour glass figure. The only thing I do to actually change myself is I shaved off some of my unsightly chest hair as I like to wear low cut dresses. Best of all, I got a compliment from my wife this morning. She is impressed with how I easily walk in a pair of black high heels with pearl straps(3 and a half inches). She says she has never been able to walk in heels. I got good at walking in them with a lot of practice.

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(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@aliceblack I'm a 43B, wear a bra all the time.  I'll have to check out these popup bras, I love low cut dresses and blouses also.  And a nice necklace.  And OMG, I love heels, I always wear 3" heels around the house, even my fuzzy slippers, I think they help to keep me trained in how to walk in heels, and oh how they shape your legs.  I easily get around in 5" stilettos, can somewhat in 6" but they are a challenge.  I wouldn't want to have to spend too much time walking in them.  4" are my favorite though, and they're high enough that they get the attention of men too.  Might sound vain, but at 75, complements about your legs sure does feel nice.   Like you say, practice, practice, practice.  It's hard work learning in just a few years all those things that cis women have been learning all their lives. And it makes you appreciate women more, what they go through to appeal to men, and compete with other women.  It's hard being female, but oh so worth it. Smile  

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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Duchess
(@aliceblack)
Joined: 4 years ago

Reputable Member     Massachusetts, United States of America
Posts: 344

@leah63 I have breasts as well/ I can easily fill out a 42B bra. I love wearing popup bras because they seem to accentuate my cleavage and I even get a cleavage line. It definitely brings more fun to my cross dressing.

 

Alice Black

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(@bianca)
Joined: 7 years ago

Noble Member     GB
Posts: 1260

@leah63 Get a good push up padded bra and you will look fab, I did and Wow! Bring on the gynaecomastia. Into corsets just now, pull em tight and up pop the girls😍

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Posts: 338
Duchess Annual
(@shadowqueen)
Reputable Member     Vermont, United States of America
Joined: 1 year ago

Hi Leah, 

i’m so glad to hear it was non cancerous. I would think that some the possible causes would make me feel even more feminine and maybe explain the urge to crossdress. High levels of estrogen, XXY factor would make me feel more like a woman. It certainly wouldn’t deter me from crossdressing at all.

hugs

AnnaBeth

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Posts: 2300
Hostess
(@ab123)
Famed Member     Surrey, United Kingdom
Joined: 4 years ago

Not an uncommon issue but at least you have had it diagnosed and it isn't harmful. The reasons are many which may indicate another condition or cause. Young males going through puberty can have this but it happens in older males when the testosterone level drops. I don't think there is any evidence that it is a cause of crossdressing but a larger breast is a bonus that's for sure.

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1 Reply
(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@ab123 There's something called Klinefelter Syndrome where males are born with an extra X chromosome, XX/XY or XXY which, of course, causes more feminine tendencies.  Surprisingly, this occurs in every 1 to 2 out of ever thousand.  Yes, that's a low percentage, but when you think about it, that's still a whole lot of men.  Our rigid interpretations of male/female were developed long, long before we ever knew about such genetic variations within our species, but now we know that there are many variations.  Since our genome isn't checked when we're born, we didn't even know about it way back in the 40's, we just don't know, but I would venture to guess that should we have it checked, a large percentage of us fall into that category.   We are who we are, we're created this way, another beautiful variation of Mother Nature. 

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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Posts: 689
Lady
(@jincrocker)
Honorable Member     Oregon, United States of America
Joined: 4 years ago

I too have gynecomastia and I love it! Having my own breasts is fun, exciting in the bedroom, and it makes my girl clothes fit better!

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1 Reply
Lady
(@opaldreams)
Joined: 3 years ago

Estimable Member     Isle of Iona, United Kingdom
Posts: 141

@jincrocker me too ! 

 

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Posts: 1163
Hostess
(@cdsue)
Noble Member     Delaware, United States of America
Joined: 4 years ago

I also have a bit of gynecomastia. It is nice having my own breasts even if they are small (A/B). My wife did mention to me at one point that I should do a self breast exam and showed me how to do it. Yes ladies males can get breast cancer too. I've had my testosterone level checked and it is low normal. Part of the reason I had it done was due to ED. I attribute some of this to age changes.

XOXO
Suzanne

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Posts: 241
Lady
(@ria)
Reputable Member     Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Joined: 4 years ago

When I reached puberty I had swollen nipples and went to the Dr who assured my parents and I there was nothing to worry about. I had been secretly wearing a bra during that time and I loved it even if the areola was sensitive. Unfortunately the condition did go away; disappointing!

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Posts: 1367
(@debbiedd)
Noble Member     los angeles, California, United States of America
Joined: 4 years ago

With aging I have developed gynecomastia and yes it is very common for males over 60 which my doctor has explained. I also know that one in four males in America also has low T levels which some blame on our processed foods but who knew. Don't be too concerned about that Leah. The upside is I am wearing a bra daily and showing cleavage. Yea

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Posts: 594
 Leah
Baroness
Topic starter
(@leah63)
Honorable Member     Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America
Joined: 6 years ago

Thank you all for your responses.  Good to hear other thoughts regarding gynecomastia. I have heard of of many times before, but up until now, never really knew that much about it.

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Posts: 1751
Baroness
(@ryanpaul)
Noble Member     Outer Eastern Suburbs Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Joined: 7 years ago

I'm in my late 70's and I'll go with the "increasing femininity" and "declining testosterone" theory.

I can almost fill an A Cup bra and abhor male underwear. I do not feel "complete" unless I have some form of lingerie under my drab and at night just adore the feelings, (mental and physical) of wearing a bra and forms, cami and panties. Summer time, as in now here here in Oz, out comes the pure silk camis and french knickers, under my male pj's When I can, (long story!!), I will have a pure silk nightie over the above

Back in September, I got caught "fully dressed" by my DADT SO. Result?? I was in male undies for a few weeks. I hated it with a passion and of course "snuck back" to my lovely "frillies".

 

Happy dressing

Caty.

 

 

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Posts: 689
Lady
(@jincrocker)
Honorable Member     Oregon, United States of America
Joined: 4 years ago

I grew up in an all female household, Mama, sister, Aunt and her two girls. I was the baby. When puberty hit and my own breasts budded, it just seemed natural. By graduation I was a full A cup, after college I barely filled and B, and now proudly carry a 42C rack. So there was a lot of female phermones around during my formative years. My sister started putting me into her panties as soon as I was out of diapers,  then into her clothes too.

A few years ago my wife discovered a lump in one breast during our play. Off for a mammogram which revealed an issue with a milk duct that resolved itself withing a few weeks. We routinely check each other for lumps, which is a fun activity!

When she was nursing the children, I began to lactate and was able to help a bit. Not much, only a few ounces daily from each side. Enough that I had to wear pads in my bra for work!

I am still perky enough that a bra is not an absolute necessity.

Now at age 75, I have hypogonadism and normal estrogen levels. I am happy with my gyno and wish everyone joy in their own journey.

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Posts: 89
(@frederique)
Estimable Member     Gelderland, Netherlands
Joined: 7 months ago

I lost about 100 pounds of weight over the last 4 years and that too can cause gynecomastia, because the fat that went into my breasts is there to stay. So I'm now enjoying a cup B that looks nice with my figure. I can accentuate them with a preformed bra when I'm en femme, but they're not too big that they really show when I'm in male mode. I'm too young still (49) for age related gynecomastia, so I'm kind of hoping my cup B will grow into a C when I do get over 60. Smile Laugh

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Posts: 310
Lady
(@cece)
Reputable Member     New York City, New York, United States of America
Joined: 4 years ago

I am a very youthful 70 years old. My doctor told me recently for the first time that my testosterone was low. I was not surprised because I have struggled increasingly with ED. I hope I get a big case of gynecomastia soon!

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2 Replies
Hostess
(@cdsue)
Joined: 4 years ago

Noble Member     Delaware, United States of America
Posts: 1163

@cece I can relate to what you are talking about. I also have ED which is an issue in and of itself. I also have a bit of gynecomastia, A/B cup. I am also 70, last time I had my testosterone level checked it was still normal but on the lower side. 

XOXO
Suzanne

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(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@cece I'm 75 now, but it was around 70 that I had the same situation.  Low testosterone of course, not abnormal by any means.  So of course the doctor suggested testosterone to bring me back to "normal".  So I said, but if I have to be taking something that changes me, then it's not "normal" and I'm going to let this ride and see where it goes.  I'm so happy I didn't take his suggestion.  I so love my new "normal", can't wait till February to see what he has to say this time.

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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Posts: 703
Baroness Annual
(@carolyn)
Prominent Member     Michigan, United States of America
Joined: 8 years ago

When I read your story it seemed like I was reading about myself. I too, had a small lump in my nipple and was sent for a mammogram, that was an experience in itself. It was also when I was diagnosed with gynecomastia. My lump also was non cancerous but my breast are for real. I am 72 and I noticed my breast were getting a little bigger, noticed a line that formed under my right breast, then my left. They are not huge by any definition, but I am enjoying what I have. 

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13 Replies
(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@carolyn I too had to go for a mammogram some years back when I found a lump in my right breast, and my history with cancer makes me, well, at bit paranoid, about it.  An experience for sure, but not at all as bad as some women make it out to be.  Fortunately, my lump was just scar tissue from my lung cancer surgery and all is well.  My breasts are about a B and still increasing, are at that point where I need to wear a bra, and I love it. 

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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Baroness Annual
(@carolyn)
Joined: 8 years ago

Prominent Member     Michigan, United States of America
Posts: 703

@jenniferr 

hi Jennifer, I too have a history of cancer, but not as serious as yours sounds. I had prostate cancer and had the radical surgery to remove it. So, like you, I too get a little paranoid. 

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(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@carolyn Cancer is like that, once you've been through it you never forget the experience, and knowing that it can, indeed, happen again, there's always a degree of paranoia.  My lung cancer was found when my right lung shut down due to pneumonia, x rays showed cancer in both lungs.  Biopsies were confusing, since they thought my cancer had metastasized from the right lung to the left and it didn't work out that way.  Further scans revealed colon cancer in the right side, which metastasized up through my liver up into my left lung, so the right lung was lung cancer and the left lung was colon cancer.  The situation didn't look promising, but with a good hospital. great surgeons, a knowledgeable oncologist, the love of my wife, and the grace of God or whoever you care to believe in, I made it.  The surgeon who removed my lungs(2/3 of the right and 1/3 of the left} said "God's not done with you yet".  Later I learned why.  4 months after my final chemo and my "clean" report my wife was diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer.  My ordeal had prepared me to emphasize and care for her, return the love she had given me.  Sometimes, life works in ways we just don't understand at the moment. 

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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Hostess
(@cdsue)
Joined: 4 years ago

Noble Member     Delaware, United States of America
Posts: 1163

@jenniferr sorry to hear of your ordeal - glad they were able to do what they did for you - hope your wife is doing okay - she's lucky to have you to take care of her

XOXO
Suzanne

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(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@cdsue Thank you for the thoughts.   My wife is gone, no one survives pancreatic cancer, especially being full blown stage 4 by the time her doctor realized what it was.  But she did last 13 months, a testament to her strength.  We were together for 50 years, married 49, she passed 2 weeks before our scheduled retirement together, and 4 months before our 50th anniversary.  Of course, I still miss her, not a day goes by that I don't think of her, but that's the way life goes, and we have to move on.  It's been 7 years since her passing, and now, after a lifetime of hiding Jennifer in the closet, fearful, ashamed, even hating her, sometimes wishing she would die and leave me alone, sneaking her out during stolen moments, buying and purging more times than I can remember, Jennifer is out of the closet. After a lifetime living as I was expected to, now it's her time.  I've gotten my ears pierced, told my friends, I'm just about full time now.  I even went shopping at Walmart today as Jennifer.  I'm happier now, feel so free since coming out to my friends, who so far have all accepted and support me.  For the first time in my life, I am Jennifer, I am who I always wanted to be, and I will never allow Jennifer to die in a dark closet.  I thank sites like this for helping me to become better, learn, relate to others like me, know that I am not alone on this confusing journey.  For the first time in longer than I can recall, I once again feel joy and am excited about what the rest of this year holds for me. 

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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Hostess
(@cdsue)
Joined: 4 years ago

Noble Member     Delaware, United States of America
Posts: 1163

@jenniferr sorry to hear about your wife's passing - it is never easy - Thank you for sharing about your journey - I am happy for you that your friends have accepted you and that you are out and being your true self 

XOXO
Suzanne

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Baroness Annual
(@carolyn)
Joined: 8 years ago

Prominent Member     Michigan, United States of America
Posts: 703

@jenniferr 

cancer is terrible, and until you have heard your own doctor tell you you have it, you really cannot understand. We have talked about this before, but it is wonderful to beat it, even for a while , to experience life. 

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(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@carolyn Oh indeed.  Hearing the doctor say it definitely has a certain mind numbing effect.  Shock and Awe thing.  Fortunately, with today's medical advances, more or us are surviving.  If I had my cancers just a decade earlier I wouldn't be here today.  It sure does make you appreciate life more, and care less what other people, especially strangers, think about you.  I'd stood on the banks of the river Styx before, in Vietnam and a motorcycle accident, but the battle with lung and colon cancer had to be the scariest thing in my life.

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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Baroness Annual
(@carolyn)
Joined: 8 years ago

Prominent Member     Michigan, United States of America
Posts: 703

@jenniferr I were will never forget the day, or should I say, the exact minute,  my doctor told me I have cancer. I remember thinking this may be the end. Instead, I made some big decisions, had radical surgery, and I am here today, as you are, enjoying life. It was shortly after all that, I had “the talk” with my wife, and my life has never been better.

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(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@carolyn Amen sister.  It's like the surgeon who removed parts of both my lungs coming into my room the next day and saying "Clean margins, Gods not done with you yet."  It's the same with you, we still have so far to go, perhaps so many lives to touch in a positive manner, and now we realize, unequivocally, that time is indeed limited, that there are no guarantees of tomorrow, life can drastically change at the utterance of one single word,  and every day we get up, can get out of bed, dress, feed, care for ourselves, is a blessing.  One word, one heartbeat, is all it takes.

Hugs,

Jennifer 

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Baroness Annual
(@carolyn)
Joined: 8 years ago

Prominent Member     Michigan, United States of America
Posts: 703

@jenniferr 

yes, life for us is definitely one day at a time. We seem to always be waiting for the other shoe to drop. However, in our case, that shoe is a high heel, lol. 

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Baroness Annual
(@conniech)
Joined: 1 year ago

Estimable Member     Fairfax , Virginia, United States of America
Posts: 177
  1. @carolyn Fantabulous! "My life has never been better." You wrote elsewhere"Today with 5cm heels I am able to dance the night away or even jump."💃🏼Your wife gifted you with support, love. How grand🌹. 
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Baroness Annual
(@carolyn)
Joined: 8 years ago

Prominent Member     Michigan, United States of America
Posts: 703

@conniech thank you Connie, my wife has given me the gift of support, although she does have a lot of rules. Lol.

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Posts: 289
Duchess
(@2bmadeline)
Reputable Member     Walla Walla, Washington, United States of America
Joined: 1 year ago

Hi Leah,

A little late to this party.

You mentioned liver problems as a possible cause. And it is a possibility. Have your PCP do a lipid profile for your next regular visit. If your liver enzymes are high, you may need an ultrasound. That will help determine if the liver is having issues. If it is, don't worry too much. The liver has the capability to heal itself if problems are caught early.

Good luck.

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2 Replies
(@jenniferr)
Joined: 8 months ago

Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Posts: 53

@2bmadeline Indeed, and have the pancreas checked.  It plays just as important role as the liver, the liver duct actually goes thru it, and unfortunately it does not heal itself.  Pancreatic cancer, like most cancers, is extremely sneaky, not revealing itself until so much damage has been done that death is almost a certainty.  Lactose intolerance, heartburn, gas and bloating, A1C going out of range for seemingly no reason, all potential signs that something is not working quite right.  Why doctors don't check the pancreas instead of prescribing pills for the symptoms is criminal.  I know, I lost my wife to pancreatic cancer, a hard and terrible battle that you know is lost right from the beginning.   She was healthy and strong, lasted 13 months until the cancer and chemo overwhelmed her.  For some reason, we're just not taught to think about something like our pancreas. 

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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Baroness Annual
(@conniech)
Joined: 1 year ago

Estimable Member     Fairfax , Virginia, United States of America
Posts: 177

@jenniferr  A sad , sad account of your once healthy wife's death. You advised several signs of something not right.Thank you💐

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Posts: 53
(@jenniferr)
Trusted Member     Greenville, South Carolina, United States of America
Joined: 8 months ago

Thank You.  After her diagnosis we did a lot of studying of course, and could see the signs of the progression of her cancer over the years.  You're going lactose intolerant because of age, even though we drank milk as a night cap for decades.  A1C getting off, well, there's a pill for that.  We trust our doctors, never thinking that they're "practicing" medicine.  Unfortunately in today's world the insurance and pharmaceutical companies rule the medical industry and insurance limits a doctors time and options, so rather than investigating the WHY of the problem a quick fix with a pill to offset or mask the problem is prescribed.  Any time something in our body drifts out of it's natural process, it's telling us something.  

Hugs,

Jennifer

 

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1 Reply
Lady
(@trudi)
Joined: 2 months ago

Trusted Member     Kansas, United States of America
Posts: 32

@jenniferr 

Thanks for your helpful advice.  Sorry for all your difficulties.  

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