• This topic has 41 replies, 17 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by Marti.
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  • #459380
    stephanie plumb
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    Good Morning” said Bilbo.

    “What do you mean?” replied Gandalf,  “Do you wish me a good morning; or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on?”

    “All of them at once.” said Bilbo……..  “What a lot of things you do use good morning for!” said Gandalf.

    Good Morning!  a typically English slightly formal greeting, less formal than “How do you do?” and much less formal than “Hello.”

    Which brings me on to ….. Doric. Now there’s a language. Old Scots. My favourite.  (groan, I hear!)        In Aberdeen they still say “Foos yer doos?” – which translates as “How are your pigeons?”   which equates to “How do you do?”  “Aye still peckin, still peckin”  is one of the correct responses.  Less archaic (pigeon fancying was a popular hobby in days gone by) is “Fit Like?” (are you okay)   replied with “Aye aye, nae bad.”

    In welsh we have “Bore da” (bore-eh-da) for Good Morning, and “Helo or Siwmae “(shoo-mai) for hello.   There lots of UK regional variations such as:- “Eh up,” “Wotcha!” “Hiya,”  “Ayup,” “All-right?”, “how do?”,  “ello me luvver.” –    and lots, lots more.

    What expressions do you have, for Good Morning or Hello,  in your neck of the woods? 

    Goodbye the noo, slinging-her-hook, Stephanie P xx

    (extract from “The Hobbit” by J.R.R Tolkien.)

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    • #460341
      Marti
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      When I was on the road, I always tried to pick up a few basic words and some useful phrases from the country I was in. Locals love it when you make an effort, even after they realise your vocabulary stops after “hello”.

      So in thai, “Sabai dee mai” – means “hello” or “how’s it going?”

      To which you answer “sabai dee”.

      Well not quite, a woman would add “kaa” to the end of the phrase and a man would add “krap” (Come on, girls – no tittering at the back of the class).
      Krap and kaa are kind of polite endings used all the time, although foreigners (falang) are excused if they forget to add them when they try to speak thai.

      Which leads us to the dilemma of a “Katoey” – the thai word for a ladyboy. They don’t just have to dress the part, they have to adjust their polite endings (no pun intended!) when they speak.

      Marti x

    • #459956
      Grace Scarlett
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      Steph….

      Due to quite a large Eastern European influx…

      this could well be quite a common accent around the west country.

      mam na imię peter, uwielbiam pić mocne lager i mieszkam w Taunton……my luvverski

      Grace x

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      • #460194
        stephanie plumb
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        Grace…. zdrastvute, privet, e nu togda do svidaniya!  ya by khotel piva, niet lager!

        Or in Scottish –  Fit like? I’ll tek a bevy wi’ ya!

        nonsense, Steph xx

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      • #460174
        Diana Morgan
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        Peter is requesting a lager in Taunton?

        Linguistically challenged Diana.

         

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        • #460179
          Grace Scarlett
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          Barmaid wanted!!!…when open, the jobs yours!!!

          • #460182
            Diana Morgan
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            Sadly the only thing that I know about Taunton is that during the North Minehead by-election Mr Hilter, the National Bocialist candidate , declared that it was “histowically a part of Minehead already” so it sounds like he really did annex Poland…

            Diana

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    • #459750
      IsabelB
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      An interesting one, Stephanie,

      I’ve come across a few from the different places I’ve lived, but mostly the North East of England (where I’m from) and Cork in Ireland (where I’ve lived for well over 20 years now)

      In the NE, usually some variant on y’alreet?  (are you all right?), possibly with a ‘pet’ or ‘flower’ added on the end…

      In Cork, ‘How’s the form?’, ‘What’s the craic?’, ‘What’s the story?’ and many, many more.  Travel around the country and there plenty more local variants too.

      On the whole subject of local language, there are many words or phrases I’ve ‘acquired’ while living here in Cork, such as ‘I will, yeah’ (meaning quite the opposite!) or ‘langer’ (hard to specify as multiuse, but a fool is nearest; add an ‘s’ and it becomes drunk!).

      There are other words I only really use when I go back to the North East of England since no-one would know what I was talking about – such as plodge, spelk, hyem (walking through water, splinter of wood, home, for those that need a translation).

      Edit: I just realised that although hyem is spelt like that, the ‘h’ is silent…

      Language is fun!

      Isabel x

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    • #459729
      Diane
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      In my home town near to Nottingham it was definitely either ‘Ay up’, ‘Ay up, Duck’ , ‘Ay up mi Duck’ or ‘Ay up, yo oright?

      I love Norfolk but it is a whole different language down here!

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    • #459570
      Stephenie Derick
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      I love Midsomer Murders.   So many great dialects.

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      • #460304
        Grace Scarlett
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        Stephanie…also, so many bodies!!!

         

    • #459507
      Angela Booth
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      I must watch more Dr Who as I need to listen to the Dialects…

    • #459495
      Effie Fulk
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      “Hey how you?” Or “hey how y’all doin”

      Here in NC 😂

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    • #459489
      Didi Phox
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      Watcha Treacle.

      I was just up the apples, putting a bit of slap on would you Adam, when the trouble burst in and said, ‘ear av a butchers at this me old china’ Dam near dropped a Richard, made a right mess of me boat.

      Anyhoo, I cast me old mince’s over your post and reckon the most common dickie ‘dan safff’ would be “alright…” usually followed by ‘mate; fella; guvna; sweetheart…’

      Right, I’m off for a cuppa Rosie, let me jam slow down.

      Ta ta

      Didi💋

       

      • #459765
        stephanie plumb
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        Nearly dropped a richard!    Well, it’s the first time (that I know of) that I’ve had such a profound effect on someone’s bowels.  I reckon you must have been peeping.

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      • #459506
        Laura Lovett
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        Pot-and-Pan and Trouble-and-Strife go Turnip-Topping

        One day when I’d washed me old Jem Mace

        and combed me Barnet fair,

        My trouble-and-strife said what about a spot of the old grey mare?

        Says I: it isn’t a ball-of-chalk on which your mind is bent:

        You’re out for a day in the turnip-tops; so we’ll borrow the Duke of Kent.

        She bought herself some daisy roots, and me a Peckham Rye,

        Then a tit-for-tat, wiv fevvers, made a hole in me houses-sky.

        Just past the Joan of Arc we scoffed a cup of you-and-me,

        With a once-or-twice of Sexton Blake, in a nice little A .B. C.

        Then out again on our plates-of-meat, spending the bees-and-honey,

        She made me wait at the Rory O’ Mores – and seemed to think it funny!

        But in a lark-and-linnet I showed who was her heap-of-coke;

        For when she fancied some almond-rocks, says I: I’m heart-of-oak.

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        • #459766
          stephanie plumb
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          Fabulous Laura – words are so powerful aren’t they?   Perhaps need a translation for the rest of the world?

          hugs Steph xx

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          • #459865
            Laura Lovett
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            The poem is by Allan M. Laing, and it’s written in Cockney rhyming slang. 

            Here’s a reference:

            Pot and pan = Man

            Trouble and strife = Wife

            Turnip topping = Shopping

            Jem Mace = Face (Names are usually of people famous when the slang was created)

            Barnet Fair = Hair (often shortened to Barnet)

            Grey mare = (fresh) air

            Ball of chalk = Walk

            Turnip tops = Shops

            Duke of Kent = Rent

            Daisy roots = Boots

            Peckam Rye = Tie

            Titfer Tat = Hat (often shortened to Titfer)

            Houses Sky: This is an interesting combination of two derived slang words, which probably stumped most!:

            The first is a shortened version of “Around the houses” = Trousers (pronounced trowsies, to thyme with “houses”).

            The second is a shortened version of sky rocket = Pocket. Two word phrases which were shortened to lose the actual rhyming part are fascinating – sometimes the research has to go the extra mile!).

            It’s not as convoluted as, say “Aris”, which I will explain on request, and probably via PM… 😁

            Joan of Arc = Park

            You and me = Tea

            Once or twice = Slice

            Sexton Blake = Cake

            A.B.C. = Aereated Bread Company, a pre-war cafe chain, as mentioned in T. S. Eliot’s “A Cooking Egg”.

            Plates of meat = Feet

            Bees and honey = Money

            Rory O’Mores = Doors

            Lark and linnet = Minute

            Heap of coke = Bloke (man, husband)

            Almond rocks = Socks

            Heart of oak = Broke, skint, out of dosh, no more money!

             

            Phew – does it all make sense now?

            Love Laura

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    • #459457
      Beth Green
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      Us Americans are a boring lot.  All we have is Hello and How are you. I love the variety of greetings from more cultured lands. So much fun learning to say hello in Australia, G’day Mate. Or Germany, Wie Gehts.

      For such a small island you Brits/Scotts/Welsh have such a wonderful variety of dialects and even seperate languages.

      America is the great melting pot but it’s identity is just a goop of everything with nothing special.

      🤐

      Beth

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    • #459420
      LisaT
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      I’m very fond of the latest Welsh phrase I heard which was “Merci beaucoup”.

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    • #459419
      Inga Krasivaya
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      Here in sunny Leicestershire the usual comment is “Ey up, me duck, y’oraight?”  Obviously, outside of Mother Nature’s Most Favoured County (and a few less fortunate areas clinging to our borders) this is incomprehensible.  The important part of the term is obviously “me duck” and apparently the etymology of the term has it as deriving from Old Norse, the original being something like “Mar Dook” meaning… nothing more exotic than “Good Morning” or “Good Day.”  I am only going on what I was told as a kid, so undoubtedly someone (Stephanie) will come up with a more accurate history of the term – if so I’m more than interested.  I realise that all you ladies coming from outside of the Greater Leicestershire area will be envious of our having such a marvellous and distinctive greeting, but – let’s face it – Leicestershire is so superior to all the outside world that we’re bound to have a superior version of our language.  Please don’t be too jealous……  Smug Inga.

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      • #459727
        Diane
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        Leicester – centre o t’Universe?   Gerraway wi ye, oo yo kiddin?  Ah wu brought up in Nottingham (though nah ah live in Norfolk near t’seaside) and all on us know that’s the centre o t’Universe all rate.

        Any road, ah gorrup this morning, looked in’ mirror and said t’ missen “What yo looking at, yo’re an ugly bogger yo are!  Yo need t’ put sum mekup on ye fizzog else yu’ll frighten cahs and osses – goo on, doe it nah!  Ah didn’t ay none at t’ time, so ah gorrin car, went dahn tahn, walked along t’corsy te t’ shop and bought missen some mekup.  Al purit on mi fizzog later.

        Am gooin t’ de some wok in t’garden nah cos ah got some plants te purrin.  They gen it aht on t’wireless that it not rain today tho it looks a bit black ovver ah Bill’s Mother’s and it’s cowd ahtside.  I thought te missen, don’t yo be mardy ye nesh bogger – just gerron wee it.

        Ah’ll mek missen up and purra frock on when am done, gorraht mi dicibels, ed a wesh and ed some snap.  Then a’ll mash missen a cuppa tea and ay a rest.

        Yo ay a good day, mi duck!

        Love Diane xxx

        And for our American friends and anyone not fortunate enough to live or have been brought up close to Sherwood Forest here is rough précis:

        Leicester  – the centre of the universe?  You must be joking.  I was raised in Nottingham (though I now live in Norfolk near to the coast) and we all know that that is the centre of the Universe.

        When I woke up this morning and looked in the mirror I didn’t like what I saw and said to myself that it might be beneficial to put some makeup on because if I didn’t I might frighten the farmyard animals. I didn’t have any makeup (not true – just a bit of literary licence), so I drove into town, walked to the shops along the pavement and bought some makeup.  I will apply it later.

        I am about to go outside to do some planting in the garden.  The weather forecast on the radio was that rain is unlikely today even though there are dark clouds in the sky.  It is rather chilly and I do tend to feel the cold when it really isn’t that bad.  I told myself to get on with the task in hand.

        When I have finished, changed out of my overalls, had a wash and had a bite to eat I will put my makeup on and slip into a dress. Then I will relax over a lovely cup of tea.

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        • #459923
          Inga Krasivaya
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          Eeeehhh:  well, me duck, yer wrong, yo little rooshan!  The Lestoh’s ninth biggest town in Englun while joshun Snot’s Ham (yup – it wah called that fost) is just an amlet be Mansfield – and usual nesh.  Up the Citeh!

          (Translation; well, Diane, you happen to be wrong, you young rascal!  Leicester happens to be the ninth largest city in England while damp, miserable Snot’s Ham (yes – that was the original name of Nottingham) is merely a hamlet near Mansfield and is most often cold and unpleasant.  On and upwards, Leicester City F.C!)

          Oh – and cheers foh menshnin snap – am avin chips & Lestoh gravy – wanted some mushy peas but am dead bonny at the mo.  (Thank you for mentioning food – I am having chips and curry sauce; I wanted some mushy peas as well but I’m still a little overweight.)

          Loads of hugs:  Inga.

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          • #460156
            Diane
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            Aah, that’s as maybe Inga burra gotta tell ye fost that Nottingum is more famus.  Everybody knows abaht Robin Ud, Sherwood Forest and Nottingum Castle.  Not that t’castle looks like a castle – it looks like a big aahs on a ill.  And don’t forget the Trip and The Sal which are t’oldest pubs in t’country.  Yo can ay a great pint or two in them when they’re oppen. O corse naah they’re shut cuz a t’virus. So nah we e te ay a drink at omm if we want one.  All bi fost in pub when it oppens again – av gorra rate thost on!

            Are yo purrin any mekkup on today?  I’m going te try aaht mi new eye shadder and lippè.  Ah reckon ahll look orrate when I do.  Ah look a bogger at t’moment – av only just goraaht a bed and av still gotta ay a  a shower and a shave.  I must do mi legs an all – they’re a bit ruff nah.

            Any road, yo ay a good day mi Duck!

            A brief synopsis:

            That may be so, Inga, but first let me remind you that Nottingham is more famous.  Everybody has heard about Robin Hood, Sherwood Forest and Nottingham Castle (not that it looks like s a castle – it resembles a large house.  And don’t forget Ye Trip to Jerusalem and The Salutation Inn which are the oldest pubs in the country.  One can enjoy a drink in them when they are open.  Of course they are close at the moment due to the virus.  One needs to have a drink at home if one wants one.  I will be the first to drop into a pub when they reopen.  I am a little parched.

            Are you going to wear any makeup today?   I intend to try out my new eye shadow and lipstick.  With a bit of look I will look presentable.  I look a little worse for wear at the moment as I have just arisen and still have to have a shower and a shave.  I really must shave my legs too as they aren’t as silky smooth as I would like at the moment.

            I hope you have an enjoyable day, my friend.

            • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Diane.
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          • #460303
            Inga Krasivaya
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            Honestly – this note just proves what an un-civilised place Nottingham is; letting your legs get stubbly… positively medieval…  Nowt wrong witha rest on it tho; Trips a decent watering hole (but the beer tastes too much of the copper).  The Sally’s pretty brill unall; Ome Ales taste like Black Annis’es dishwater though.  Mind – Everards ent even up tuh a pint of Soar water, so score draw on that one (not that the Florists get a good un like that too offen.)  Not dooin any mekup cos ah’m bluddy usliss arit; ah end up looing like a ten bob tart up Highfields…  An now ah’ll wind me neck in…

            (There is nothing wrong with the rest of this  note though; the Olde Trip To Jerusalem is indeed a very pleasant pub, tough the beer is a little expensive.  The Salutation is similarly go; Home Ales, however, are generally a little unpleasant.  Mind, Everards [brewed in Leicester] tastes pretty revolting, so I can’t decry Nottingham on that point.  [There then follows a snide insult about Nottingham Forest F.C. who are languishing near the bottom of the Championship and may yet be relegated.]  I will not being applying any makeup today as I lack the necessary skill and end up looking just a little less than classy.  And I will now be quiet…

            Should anyone require information on Black Annis, the Leicester witch, please let me know and I’ll bore you to tears on the subject…

        • #459816
          Grace Scarlett
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          Brilliantly done Diane….

          Replies with subtitles should be a regular thing… especially when our steph goes all ” doric”.

          Grace xx

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        • #459764
          stephanie plumb
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          Fantastic stuff  Diane!    Love your “accent!”  Language is a wonderful thing when used like this.

          Well done.  Our kids both went to Nottingham University and loved it there! No less then three Wetherspoons in walking distance of each other!  Our daughter still lives there and works for the Uni.

          I always though that Leicester was a covid ridden city where folk were not obeying the rules, in a hole in the middle of England somewhere. Lol. Just joking.

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          • #459846
            Diane
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            Although I migrated elsewhere a few years back, I’m a Nottingham girl at heart but I love visiting Leicester too.  It is also a great city.

            No daht abaht it!

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      • #459433
        Laura Lovett
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        I learned, from an ex who is from Leicester, that there is no vowel sound equating to “uh” in Leicester (or any UK county north of there).

        The nearest equivalent is “ooh”.

        So “Duck” doesn’t sound as “duhck”, but “doohk”, the word “Up” doesn’t sound like “Uhp”, but “Oohp”.

        Interestingly, the “ah” sound also changes in the north, even though the northern vowel sounds include the sound, e.g., in the word “Are”, although this tends to sound like “Oor”, or “Oar”.

        This has an equivalence in some Scottish dialects – I’m thinking of the kid’s comic, “Oor Wullie”.

        So the word “castle” sounds like “carsol” in the South of England and “cassel” in the north – as in Newcassel”. In Leicester, it’s more like “coorsul”.

        Aren’t accents interesting?

        Love Laura

         

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        • #459441
          Inga Krasivaya
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          This one is phenomenally interesting – a lot because it mentions a lot of things I never realised but now recognise!  “Up” versus “oohp” – accepted; it usually does sound more like the latter.  “Uh” or “ooh”; mostly accepted – a lot seems to depend on which part of the Most Favoured County you come from and (especially) your age.  For so many of us, it’s not “Leicester” it’s more like “Leicestoh” or “Leicestah“.  And “castle” or “coorsul”… well, the “ul” bit is definitely right, but the “coors” bit is pretty much only the elder folk in the north of the county now.

          Thanks for this one, Laura; really engages my interest – and makes me write loads of stuff that makes me appear even duller and less interesting than usual!  (Oh – and if you want to hear a genuine Leicester accent, don’t listen too carefully to Gary Lineker; he’s a genuine Leicesterian but he’s lost his accent……)  South Leicester Girl Inga.

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          • #459569
            Laura Lovett
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            I went to college in Northampton, which used to be part of Leicester University, but is now a university in its own right.

            Interestingly, Northampton wasn’t allowed to have a university – it was banned hundreds of years ago, in 1265, after a mere 4 years in operation – and the ban was only lifted in 2005.

            When I went, it was called Nene college (pronounced “Nen”, to contrast with the nearby River Nene, which rhymes with “scene”).

            Both Oxford and Cambridge saw it as a threat, because it attracted high calibre students from oop narth, simply because it was easier to get to. It was the 3rd oldest university in England, after the more famous pair.

            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Northampton_(13th_century)

            I am not making this up!

            I met a lot of Leicester and Milton Keynes people there, and, despite the roundabouts, I found the latter to be very nice. I particularly enjoyed Bletchley, where I visited the Marshall factory and had the awesome guided tour.

            My brother used to visit me at college, and liked Northamptonshire so much he bought a house there.

            Gives me a good excuse to go back and visit Abington park and the Racecourse.

            Not sure I have much to revisit in Thurston though…

            Love Laura

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      • #459425
        Grace Scarlett
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        I googled ” Leicester”…..

        A city in Englands east midlands region… famed for the modesty of its inhabitants.

        Smiles, grace x

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        • #459442
          Inga Krasivaya
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          Grace; can you let me know which dictionary that is in, as I want to buy one!  Etymology Inga.

          2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #459407
      Krista
      Duchess
      Registered On: January 24, 2017
      Topics: 8
      Replies: 531
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      Howdy Stephanie,

      Here in northwest Canada, we still have a few cowpokes around.  A proper greeting is Howdy Partner or Howdy ya’ll.

      But being in Canada the perception by the rest of the world is that we’d say Good Morning eh!

      But you know, the jig is up.  I’d have to say that this city-slicker is pretty darn boring and it is usually just Good Morning or Hello.  Head ’em up, move ’em out.  Yeehaw.

      Hugs, Krista.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #459411
        stephanie plumb
        Baroness - Annual
        Registered On: November 17, 2018
        Topics: 146
        Replies: 1951
        Has thanked: 3114 times
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        Whip!! CRACK!!  Rawhide!!!  Young Clint Eastwood.. John Wayne ….. Ward Bond… Stumpy (that’s me)

        They made a good western back then..  guaranteed bar brawls ..  corseted women. Nostalgia.

        Hugs

        cowgirl, Steph

        3 users thanked author for this post.
    • #459401
      Grace Scarlett
      Baroness - Annual
      Registered On: February 16, 2021
      Topics: 51
      Replies: 1093
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      Good afternoon Steph..

      The west country has a language all of it own, sometimes dependant on how much or how little cyder has been consumed!!.

      Soberly speaking…you may hear…

      ” How be on” or ” alrite me luvver”…both meaning, how are you doing.

      If you ask someone to do something soon….of course, it will be done ” dreckly”

      and if you want to know where  someone is, you ask “where you to”?

      Mangel Wurzel xx

       

      6 users thanked author for this post.
      • #459408
        stephanie plumb
        Baroness - Annual
        Registered On: November 17, 2018
        Topics: 146
        Replies: 1951
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        Dear mangel,

        That be Wilkins Cider, be it?  “The worlds best cider” like every pasty shop in Padstow says “the worlds best pasty.”

        I hear it’s only about a pound a pint if you order a 20litre container.

        I had a friend who’s nickname was “worzel”  – after Worzel Gummidge, who he looked like, tall and skinny with unkempt blonde hair.

        grumpy, doh! scrumpy Steph xxx

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #459390
      Clara Cross
      Lady
      Registered On: December 7, 2020
      Topics: 9
      Replies: 225
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      Before coffee or after?

      Before it’s, “arrghrumpah ar ar arg”

      After it’s, “How are you my sweet darling? I hope you are as wonderful as I feel. May you have the most incredible day.”

      Now let me have my Java sweet darling.

      Best,

      Caffeine Clara

       

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      • #459421
        Grace Scarlett
        Baroness - Annual
        Registered On: February 16, 2021
        Topics: 51
        Replies: 1093
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        Clara….may your coffee pot always be full!!!!

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #459389
      Sandy Jayson
      Duchess
      Registered On: September 29, 2019
      Topics: 20
      Replies: 451
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      . Often I am greeted with ” How are you today”. To which I sometimes respond with how I am actually doing including aches and pains. Sometimes I respond with “peachy” which gets a pleasent smile in response.
      . Sandy

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #459384
      Diana Morgan
      Lady
      Registered On: February 22, 2021
      Topics: 7
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      My Ulster cousins used to say something like “Hoos aboot ye?” As a greeting.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
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