Sometimes I Think The Stares Lead To Acceptance

People staring at crossdressers

I was moved by the sentiment in this week’s Crossdressing Success Story. It’s not one of first experiences, or feminine perfection. It’s more powerful. It’s a story of courageous outreach born of a deep self confidence. It’s a perfect example of how to change the hearts and minds of others without even saying a word.

If you have a real life crossdressing success story you’d life to share, please take a moment to submit your crossdresser success story.

Now I’ll let Jill tell her story…

Crossdresser Heaven - Find Your Tribe

Jill’s Crossdressing Success Story

After reading your post on staring (Ed – stare at a crossdresser?), I thought I’d reply with my recent experience. My friend Gale and I were on our way to Milwaukee’s Pridefest celebration when we stopped at a McDonalds for a bite to eat (much cheaper than eating at the festival). We were both dressed to blend in rather than stand out but niether one of us speaks in a feminine voice and our baritone is a dead giveaway to our masculine side. As we ordered none of the counter people made eye contact with us but after receiving our meals we sat in a semi enclosed area to eat and chat.

The tee hees and whispers started as soon as we walked away from the counter. I guess the young people on staff had never seen a couple of Tgirls before because it seemed as if everybody from the counter, to drive through, to kitchen staff walked past our table to get a better look. Gale and I found it quite amusing but at the same time flattering for being noticed by so many. Most of the other customers didn’t seem to bat an eye in our direction but the young staffers showed a great deal of curiosity.

I don’t know how to label the looks and stares but niether Gale nor I felt awkward or uncomfortable, as I think the young staffers did. After eating, we continued on to Pridefest where we enjoyed entertainment by Patti Labelle. The festival started breaking up around midnight and as we drove back to my suburban community, my car died and I had to call for a tow. The driver was very courteous and treated us both as ladies, but I’m willing to bet he had plenty ot tell his co workers when he got back to his shop. Sometimes I think the stares lead to acceptance. Luv and Hugs, Jill

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  1. Carol 8 years ago

    Racquel Lynn, Im shocked at your experience. I too am aquainted with many medical professionals, teachers, doctors, and nurses. never once have I been looked over, at least scrutinized. NEVER. I would hope I didnt rate their curiosity bell going off. I have had some kids over at the college, not guys but teenage girls give me a little grief. maybe percieved by myself, but not really fact. I had a couple young girls seem to notice me, and they walked toward me, and I stepped out right in front of them, looked em right in the eyes, and said " lovely day isnt it"?? and they just turned and walked away. No nothing, no reaction…… I bluffed them. Carol

  2. Racquel Lynn 8 years ago

    I agree. I think that anything that is new or different or not the "norm" to any of us gets our couriousity and that these days, there are many more people willing to accept us, although, for most people, it is still rare that they encounter a transgendered person during their day. I believe that most people do not mean any harm in their stares, they just want a good look at something they don't usually see and want to be able to take it all in and get used to it or to simply convince themselves that they really are seeing what they think they see.

    • Racquel Lynn 8 years ago

      I have had the stares and occasional parade of people taking turns walking past who were OBVIOUSLY trying not to be obvious. But it only really bothered me one time when I went to visit a friend working in a hospital. I was waiting by the elevator accross from the cafeteria until she was ready for me to come up to her floor. Then the first person comes out of the cafeteria and walked past me, then does a u-turn back into the cafeteria where I could see her pointing me out to others in the cafeteria. Immediately, it was one after another walking out and going past me to get a closer look. Not all coming out at once and trying to space it out as to not be obvious, but it was, especially when most of them pretended to walk down the hall like they were going to do something but only turned around and went back into the cafeteria.

      • Racquel Lynn 8 years ago

        The only reason it bothered me this time is because it was the worst case I had seen and these people are supposed to be medical professionals (not one person coming out for a glimpse was a visitor, they were all staff, nurses, etc.) They are supposed to be trained to act better and deal with things like that with more respect and dignity. Quite frankly, the busload of middle school field trip students that came into McDonald's while I was eating once were far more adult about it and gave far less stares and snickers than the staffers at the hospital.
        I totally understand peoples curiousity and usually do not mind the stares, but medical professionals I hold to a higher standard. Not that they shouldn't have a little stare, but to go out of their way like they did to get it was totally unprofessional.
        I do have to say though, that I do prefer the person that will come up and talk to me and ask me questions over someone who just stares. I think it is great therapy to talk about it with other people and it helps to educate people and spread a more positive image for us.

      • Vanessa Law 8 years ago

        Yikes, not a fun experience hon, sorry about that…

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