The pandemic has driven students away from schools and colleges, but there is a type of school/college event that draws the attention of crossdressers: the womanless beauty pageants.

Event where the boys/men parade with beautiful (or not) dresses, wigs, shoes, jewelry and makeup.

If you search the internet, you will see several types of “womanless”: from the simplest – in which the candidates are mere caricatures – to the most detailed – when the candidates are better dressed and really want to look like women.

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At the school I studied there were never womanless beauty pageants, there was only one day when the students in my class decided to wear clothes of the opposite sex – I did not participate because I was ashamed … soon I, who at 11 or 12 went to school in days cold using a bra under various clothes … And on that day the boys wore dresses (not ball gowns) … without a bra!

For me, dressing up as a woman without a bra is like going to Paris and not visiting the Eiffel Tower.

I wanted to participate in a womanless, learn to walk in high heels, wear a beautiful flowing dress and a beautiful wig with good makeup. And beautiful lingerie underneath.

In fact, at that time I was not attracted to women’s clothing other than bras …

Incredibly, many conservative parents don’t care that their child participates in a womanless, on the contrary: it encourages and even participates in the boy’s preparation.

Perhaps because many of these womanless events are aimed at raising funds for charities.

They would probably have a different reaction if they found out that the son likes crossdressing or even was LGBTQIA+.

I think that when things go back to normal, events like this should be resumed, even in schools where there was no such event.

This would lessen prejudices against crossdressing and even against women.

In addition, for a day the boy who likes women’s clothes could do it without much judgment – even because his classmates would also be dressed the same way – and I could have worn my bra (or rather, my sister\’s) at school without problems for at least a day.

If womanless were popularized, I believe that many who today fear or are ashamed to participate in this type of event would do so. I confess that my biggest fear of participating in a womanless was not the moment of the event, but the photos that eternalize moments like this. What if someone saw a picture of me dressed as a woman?

If all – or practically all – men had their “princess photo”, I think that would no longer be a problem.

I think if one day he has a son – in fact, I prefer to have a daughter – maybe he will give him a princess day – at least once, if there is no opportunity for a womanless and especially if he does not have a daughter.

I don’t want to force him do it, but I want him to have the opportunity to try something different at least once without judgments, without fear and without the need to hide – as it happened to me when I started trying on my sister’s bra at 12.

If he tries and doesn’t like it, I won’t force him.

It is not only in middle and high school that Womanless Beauty pageants takes place. Even in colleges it exists. The photo that illustrates this article is from one of the editions of “Miss Engineering”, a Womanless from a University of the Philippines. It is one of the most well-designed and best – perhaps the best -womanless in the world.

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I believe that the pandemic showed that life is too short for fears, prejudices and the like. I think that when we get out of this madness, we should celebrate in every way … including with a Womanless.

Start thinking about your dress!

 

Have you ever wanted to participate in a womanless beauty pageant?

Have you participated? How was it?

Tell us in the comments, I look forward to knowing.

Sincerely, Marie Claire

 

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Peggy Sue Williams
Duchess
Noble Member
1 month ago

Prior to COVID restrictions, womanless beauty pageants were very common throughout the southeast U.S., produced mostly as fund raisers for various organizations. Mothers, sisters, and other interested females would often spend days, if not weeks, preparing their chosen contestant for the competition. Boys and men were turned into extremely attractive ladies, who were coached how to walk, talk, and act like the ladies they were. My guess? Several of the participating males were already CDs or would soon become CDs, having been attracted to the Pink Fog. Being known in the local community as a CD can sometimes result in… Read more »

Phrieda Platforms
27 days ago
Reply to  Marie Claire

I have done 6 and I can remember all of them and the event’s leading to the pageants . Of the 6 I was Mizz Relay 4 times . That put me in dresses for several more events thru the year .

Susan Sue
Duchess
Active Member
1 month ago

Yes I would just love to be able to participate in one. It would be an incredible experience and a ton of fun.

72christine
30 days ago

That would be a fun and exciting adventure. I would to enter some day.

Jane Don
Member
29 days ago

Hmmm–I’ve never heard of this–

Peggy Sue Williams
Duchess
Noble Member
28 days ago
Reply to  Jane Don

Also search Youtube.

Jayne Destiny
28 days ago

I have never participated in one, but I would love to do that. I wouldn’t pass on an opportunity to wear a beautiful gown and raise money for a great cause?

Jayne Destiny
28 days ago
Reply to  Marie Claire

Sounds like a win-win for everyone  

Amy Myers
Baroness
Noble Member
28 days ago

I have never participated in a womanless pagent, but it would be fun to try! Though to be honest the boat has sailed for this chick with 68 on the horizon. I look good for my age, but not like I would have done a couple of decades ago.

I think these are wonderful events, as they bring crossdressing out into the open, but not as comedy, or drag, like Drag Race, but as men trying to look like pretty women.

Thank you for a nice and well written article Marie Claire.
Amy

Caty Ryan
Baroness
Active Member
28 days ago

Since I discoverd them on You Tube many years ago, womanless pageants have fascinated me. 1/. “cos I’d loved to have been in one and b/. the fact they are mainly held in the south of the US, where from this far away in OZ, such events seemed to be totally opposed to the “rough, redneck” image, (rightly or wrongly) of that part of the world. I also agree that some of the young high school boys look and move so good, they are either bordering on becoming VD’s for life or are already “there” Caty. PS Same goes for… Read more »

Phrieda Platforms
27 days ago

Womanless pageants , Being a contestant in the same pageant 6 years straight . I would encourage everyone to try at least once if given the chance . Luckily the shops in town were kind enough to donate a dress a few years and most of the women were “very willing” to help with my makeup and wig during the pageants . I had a great time and would do it again . Unfortunately , the fundraiser I was doing it for has dropped the womanless pageants . They said it was do to lack of interest . Like most… Read more »

Aoife
Active Member
26 days ago

The whole pageant part never appealed to me, but it still makes me envious. I think I had heard of (or at least imagined) something like it when I was a boy and would fantasise about it all the time. However, I know my mom would have ruined the whole thing and it would have made me even more ashamed, which of course I would never have heard the end of. I went to the famously LGBT+-friendly Emerson College, so there we didn’t have “womanless beauty pageants” but instead student drag shows. I do regret not doing that, but it… Read more »

Jenny Thigh High
Active Member
26 days ago

Have never done it, but would love to do it.
As you noted the Philippines in your article, Lady Boy culture is VERY VERY strong there.
And the pageants are a big part of that. Overall though, it’s more of an LGBTQ thing there, same as with Thailand. For whatever reason, the Lady Boy culture thrives and endures in those two countries.

Jenny Thigh High
Active Member
26 days ago
Reply to  Marie Claire

Yes I’ve traveled and met Ladyboys from both countries. No one can really say why it is so popular there….it just is. Not always accepted, but certainly much more common than in other countries.

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